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  • Tennis, anyone?

    Tennis, anyone?

    When it comes to heart health, there’s a lot to love about racket sports. If you haven’t lobbed a tennis ball over a net since high school, you might want to pick up a racket again. A recent study suggests that people who play racket sports regularly may slash their odds of dying from a […]

  • Getting a start on growing stronger

    Getting a start on growing stronger

    Building strength and power is key to healthy aging, both physically and mentally. It may be easier than you think. We probably don’t need to remind you that your body changes with age. Age-related muscle loss begins at around age 35 and progresses slowly — at about 1% per year. But after about age 60, […]

  • Boozing increases age of cells, risk for health conditions

    Boozing increases age of cells, risk for health conditions

    MONDAY, June 26, 2017 — The more you booze it up, the more your cells age, increasing your risk for age-related health problems like heart disease, diabetes, cancer and dementia, a new study suggests. Researchers studied 134 alcoholics between the ages of 41 and 85 and a control group of people in the same age […]

  • Drug cocktail may help prevent sepsis shock, death

    Drug cocktail may help prevent sepsis shock, death

    June 26 (UPI) — In lower income countries, mortality rates from sepsis — an overwhelming response to infection that leads to tissue damage, organ failure and death — can exceed 60 percent and accounts for 400,000 deaths annually in the United States alone. But researchers report in a new study, published in the June edition […]

  • Study: Premature infants at greater risk of SIDS

    Study: Premature infants at greater risk of SIDS

    June 26 (UPI) — A new study from Rutgers University researchers has found that premature infants are still at a greater risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, or SIDS. The greater risk of SIDS in premature infants compared to full-term infants remains despite recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics that Neonatal Intensive Care Units, […]

  • Researchers use magnetic implants to treat ‘dancing eyes’

    Researchers use magnetic implants to treat ‘dancing eyes’

    June 26 (UPI) — Scientists are using magnetic implants inserted behind the eye to treat nystagmus, a condition causing involuntary eye movements or dancing eyes. The study by the University College London and the University of Oxford used a newly developed set of magnets in the socket beneath each eye of a patient with nystagmus […]

  • Bone loss in HIV patients linked to early antiretroviral therapy

    Bone loss in HIV patients linked to early antiretroviral therapy

    June 26 (UPI) — A recent study has found a link between early antiretroviral treatment, or ART, with an increased risk of bone loss in patients with HIV infection. The study, published today in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, showed a negative effect on bone density in patients who received immediate ART compared […]

  • Childhood poverty may predict heart failure in adulthood

    Childhood poverty may predict heart failure in adulthood

    MONDAY, June 26, 2017 — Growing up poor might put you at risk for heart failure in adulthood, a new study suggests. Heart failure, a progressive condition, means the heart isn’t pumping as well as it should. This causes fatigue and shortness of breath, and can make everyday activities difficult to carry out. Finnish researchers […]

  • Gene sequencing may reveal risks for rare diseases

    Gene sequencing may reveal risks for rare diseases

    MONDAY, June 26, 2017 — “Genome sequencing” of healthy people reveals that some are at risk for rare genetic diseases, a new study shows. And doctors need to be sensitive when revealing that information, the researchers said. “Sequencing healthy individuals will inevitably reveal new findings for that individual, only some of which will have actual […]

  • Early cardiology care linked to lower stroke risk in afib patients

    Early cardiology care linked to lower stroke risk in afib patients

    June 27 (UPI) — Research by Stanford University found that patients with atrial fibrillation who received early cardiology care had a reduced risk of stroke. Atrial fibrillation, an irregular heart rhythm, increases the risk of stroke and other heart complications, and affects between 3 million and 5 million Americans. The study found that patients receiving […]

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