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Prostate Cancer
 

  • No link found between prostate cancer and vasectomy

    No link found between prostate cancer and vasectomy

    Good news for the millions of men worldwide who’ve had vasectomies: a new study disputes a link between this birth-control operation and prostate cancer. Two 1990 studies that connected prostate cancer and vasectomies caused men to question the procedure, even though no medical explanation for the connection could be found. Other research has both confirmed […]

  • Acetaminophen and prostate cancer

    Acetaminophen and prostate cancer

    Q. I was very interested in your article on aspirin and cancer. You commented that aspirin may help prevent cancer, but I can’t take aspirin, even in low doses. I use Tylenol for pain and fever — can it also help against cancer? A. The aspirin story is encouraging, but it’s a work in progress. […]

  • Ask the doctor: BPH drugs for preventing prostate cancer

    Ask the doctor: BPH drugs for preventing prostate cancer

    Q. I take Avodart for my enlarged prostate. But I heard that Avodart increases prostate cancer risk. Is that true? Should I quit taking Avodart? A. You are on the right track about the cancer risk, but it’s complicated. In June 2011, the FDA did, in fact, add a warning to the label of Avodart […]

  • ED drugs after cancer treatment don’t protect erectile function

    ED drugs after cancer treatment don’t protect erectile function

    Taking daily doses of the erectile dysfunction drug tadalafil (Cialis) does not reduce erectile problems in men undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer, according to a clinical trial in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Some men who have radiation treatment for prostate tumors later have trouble getting or maintaining erections. Researchers have explored […]

  • Tomatoes and prostate cancer

    Tomatoes and prostate cancer

    (Journal of the National Cancer Institute, March 6, 2002 issue) — Frequent consumption of tomato products may be associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer, concludes a study in the March 6 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Previous research has suggested that frequent consumption of tomato products or lycopene, an […]

  • Bladder cancer: Men at risk

    Bladder cancer: Men at risk

    Genitourinary malignancies are a worry for men. In adolescents and young adults, testicular cancer is the main concern. One of the unappreciated benefits of growing older is that cancer of the testicles becomes rare — but as men outgrow that risk, they face the problem of prostate cancer. With these well-publicized diseases to head their […]

  • Prostate Cancer

    Prostate Cancer

    What Is It? Prostate cancer results from the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the prostate gland. This gland produces part of the fluid in semen. It is located below the bladder and in front of the rectum, near the base of the penis. Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in […]

  • Reducing prostate cancer risk: Good news, bad news, or no new news?

    Reducing prostate cancer risk: Good news, bad news, or no new news?

    Prostate cancer is an important disease; in fact, it’s the most common internal malignancy in American men. Prostate cancer is a variable disease; many cases are slow growing, even harmless, but some cases are aggressive and even lethal. And it’s a puzzling disease; some cases are passed down from father to son, but most occur […]

  • On call: Penile shortening post-prostatectomy

    On call: Penile shortening post-prostatectomy

    Q. I am trying to decide between a radical prostatectomy and radioactive seed therapy for my newly diagnosed prostate cancer. All the doctors I’ve consulted say I have very early disease (PSA 4.9, Gleason score 6) and that I should be cured either way. I’m basing my decision on side effects, but I need more […]

  • An option for low-risk prostate cancer

    An option for low-risk prostate cancer

    For some men, the smartest move after diagnosis may be to delay treatment and carefully watch the progression of the cancer. After a prostate biopsy confirms cancer, the next step might seem obvious: get treatment as soon as possible, either by removing the prostate gland entirely (radical prostatectomy) or zapping it with radiation. But immediate […]

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