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Stroke
 

  • Do you know how to respond to a ministroke?

    Do you know how to respond to a ministroke?

    News briefs A ministroke, or transient ischemic attack (TIA), occurs when blood flow to part of the brain is blocked temporarily. It often causes one or two symptoms of a full-blown stroke — such as sudden face drooping, arm or leg weakness, confusion, slurred speech, or terrible headache — and typically lasts just a few […]

  • Can your blood pressure be too low?

    Can your blood pressure be too low?

    Recent findings raise concerns about lowering diastolic blood pressure — the second number in your blood pressure reading — too far. Image: © Wavebreakmedia/Thinkstock More of us than ever before are taking medications to lower our blood pressure. Longstanding guidelines suggest that most people should aim for a systolic blood pressure (the first number in […]

  • Weight-related stroke risk varies for different stroke types, analysis finds

    Weight-related stroke risk varies for different stroke types, analysis finds

    Research we’re watching Being overweight has long been associated with a higher risk of stroke for women. However, a recent analysis of a large observational study indicates that the correlation holds only for strokes caused by blood clots (the most common kind). In fact, heavier women actually have a lower risk of bleeding strokes compared […]

  • FDA approves a one-two punch for some strokes

    News Briefs Image: iStock Encouraging news on the treatment of strokes caused by blood clots: there are now two first-line therapies to break up the clots and restore blood flow to the brain. In addition to using a clot-busting drug (called tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA), the FDA now says it’s okay for doctors to […]

  • What is a lacunar stroke?

    What is a lacunar stroke?

    Ask the doctor Q. I just reviewed my mother’s medical record and it says she had a lacunar stroke. What is that? A. Most strokes result from a blockage in a blood vessel supplying the brain. Lacunar strokes, which account for about one-fifth of all strokes, are those that occur in small arteries deep inside […]

  • Afib stroke prevention: Go set a Watchman?

    Ask the doctor Image: Valeriya/Thinkstock Q. I have atrial fibrillation and take Eliquis to prevent blood clots. While I have not had side effects from this medication, I understand there is a new implant that might allow me to stop taking the drug. Should I consider this new device? Is it as safe or safer […]

  • Should I try a new blood thinner?

    Ask the doctor Image: © bowdenimages/Thinkstock Q. I’ve been taking the blood thinner warfarin (Coumadin) for a few years. I know there are new kinds of blood thinners, but I’ve heard they have downsides. Should I stick with warfarin? A. Here’s what you need to know. Some medical conditions lead to blood clots. The most […]

  • Nordic diet linked to lower stroke risk

    Research we’re watching Following a Nordic diet — which features fish, whole grains, plus fruits and vegetables popular in Scandinavian countries — may help lower the risk of stroke, a new study suggests. The study, published in the February 2017 issue of Stroke, included more than 55,000 Danish people from a national health registry, all […]

  • Migraine sufferers have a higher risk for stroke after surgery

    Migraine sufferers have a higher risk for stroke after surgery

    In the journals People who suffer from migraines have increased risks of stroke and hospital readmission within 30 days after having surgery, according to research published online Jan. 10, 2017, by BMJ. The study included 124,558 patients (45% of whom were men), who had a history of migraines, either with or without aura (a period […]

  • Blood markers for heart disease linked to microscopic strokes

    Blood markers for heart disease linked to microscopic strokes

    Research we’re watching Aging brains often show signs of microscopic strokes, which result from damage to tiny blood vessels within the brain. Those that occur in the brain’s outermost layer — called cortical cerebral microinfarcts (CMIs) — usually don’t cause any symptoms. But they are more common in autopsies of people diagnosed with dementia. Now, […]

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