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Healthy Eating
 

  • Ask the doctor: Should I get more potassium from a salt substitute?

    Ask the doctor: Should I get more potassium from a salt substitute?

    Q. You’ve emphasized that people generally eat too much sodium and not enough potassium. Could I solve both problems at once by replacing my regular table salt with a substitute containing potassium? A. Many Americans do eat too much sodium and not enough potassium. Your condiment approach to the sodium/potassium balancing act might help, but […]

  • Sodium/potassium ratio important for health

    Sodium/potassium ratio important for health

    Sodium is often blamed for boosting blood pressure while potassium is praised for keeping it in check. It really doesn’t make sense to look at these two minerals separately, though, since they work in tandem throughout the body. The ratio of sodium to potassium in the diet may be more important than the amount of […]

  • Can a hospital stay make you anemic?

    Can a hospital stay make you anemic?

    Frequent blood testing after a heart attack can deplete red blood cells. Anemia — having too few oxygen-carrying red blood cells in circulation — is a blood problem that plagues millions of people. Among anemia’s many possible causes are diets poor in iron or folic acid, kidney disease, internal bleeding, and cancer. Now, add a […]

  • Magnesium content in milligrams (mg) of certain foods

    Magnesium content in milligrams (mg) of certain foods

    Magnesium content in milligrams (mg) of certain foods Food Measure Magnesium Bulgur, dry 1 cup 230 Barley, pearled, raw 1 cup 158 Spinach, cooked 1 cup 157 Seeds, pumpkin, roasted 1 ounce 156 Cornmeal, yellow 1 cup 155 Beans, black, boiled 1 cup 120 Beet greens, cooked 1 cup 98 Halibut, cooked 3 ounces 90 […]

  • Berry good for health

    Berry good for health

    Berries are healthful and delicious, even if some of the health claims may be a little bit exaggerated. Summer is berry season. The prime time for strawberries is winding down here in the Northeast, but July is the month for raspberries and blueberries, and blackberries will be ready for picking in August. Berries are perhaps […]

  • Ask the doctor: Have I given up steak for nothing?

    Ask the doctor: Have I given up steak for nothing?

    Q. I read that Harvard researchers found no association between eating red meat and developing heart disease and diabetes. Have I been depriving myself of steak for more than 20 years for no good reason? A. In 2011 some of my colleagues at the Harvard School of Public Health reported findings from a meta-analysis that […]

  • Latest thinking on a “cardioprotective” diet

    Latest thinking on a “cardioprotective” diet

    The focus is on foods, not on food components like fat and fiber. Scientific research often advances our understanding of health and disease. Sometimes, though, it leads to dead ends. The latter is what happened to several decades of nutrition research that focused on individual nutrients like cholesterol, saturated fat, fiber, and antioxidants. Although that […]

  • The overlooked hazards of holiday eating

    The overlooked hazards of holiday eating

    Don’t let foodborne pathogens crash your party. Most people are aware of the dangers of overeating and overimbibing during the winter holidays, but few worry about a lesser-known risk of year-end celebrations. Every year, 48 million Americans develop foodborne illness (also known as food poisoning or stomach flu), most of which isn’t reported to health […]

  • Sugar and your heart: Sour news about sweets

    Sugar and your heart: Sour news about sweets

    Blame it on our Puritan heritage, medical naysayers, or even nagging newsletters. Whatever the cause, many people share the view that anything that feels good or tastes good must be bad for you. Recent studies have exonerated coffee and others say that dark chocolate, nuts, and moderate amounts of alcohol may actually be beneficial. But […]

  • Fruit and veggie diet may offset genetic risk for heart disease

    Fruit and veggie diet may offset genetic risk for heart disease

    The old adage that you can’t change your genes may be true, but research suggests that lifestyle choices can modify some of the influence your genes have on your health. Case in point is one study that determined that a “prudent” diet — especially one replete with raw vegetables and fruits — can noticeably reduce […]

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