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  • Harvard study links depression to stroke

    Harvard study links depression to stroke

    Here’s another reason to get depression treated as soon as possible: a Harvard study found that people with persistent symptoms of severe depression were twice as likely to suffer a stroke compared with people who have mild symptoms. The study appeared May 13, 2015, in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Researchers looked at […]

  • The best ways to treat spider veins

    The best ways to treat spider veins

    Ask the doctor Q: I have developed numerous small, thin veins over my legs. I would like to get rid of them. What is the most effective treatment? A: Dilated superficial veins, known as reticular or “spider” veins, are a common problem as men get older. The preferred treatment is sclerotherapy, but laser therapy is […]

  • Can stem cells treat eye disease?

    Can stem cells treat eye disease?

    Ask the doctor Q. I heard about a breakthrough in using stem cells to treat eye diseases. What is this about? A. You probably are referring to two studies published in March 2016 in the journal Nature. They are just the latest examples of how advances from basic research on stem cells are already entering […]

  • Surgery for weight loss: A standard treatment for type 2 diabetes?

    Surgery for weight loss: A standard treatment for type 2 diabetes?

    Gastric bypass procedure should be used more often, experts say Weight-loss surgery not only leads to dramatic weight loss, it also reverses type 2 diabetes in most people who undergo these stomach-shrinking procedures. In fact, international diabetes organizations now say that surgery for weight loss should become a more routine treatment option for people with […]

  • Hepatitis C: Still a major risk for baby boomers

    Hepatitis C: Still a major risk for baby boomers

    News briefs Image: © jarun011/Thinkstock New cases of hepatitis C — a viral infection that attacks the liver — are at a 15-year high, according to surveillance data from the CDC released online May 11, 2017. The CDC estimates that there were about 34,000 new cases in 2015. Young adults (ages 20 to 29) account […]

  • Prescribing “the best medicine”

    Prescribing “the best medicine”

    Are you exercising enough to prevent heart disease? It can help you lose weight; decrease your blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar; and reduce your stress. But wait, there’s more: it also lowers your odds of a heart attack or other cardiovascular event and may even extend your life. This wonder drug isn’t a drug […]

  • Medicare now covers exercise training for blocked leg arteries

    Medicare now covers exercise training for blocked leg arteries

    Research we’re watching About 8.5 million Americans have peripheral artery disease, or PAD, in which fatty plaque clogs arteries outside of the heart, most commonly in the legs. The hallmark symptom is calf or thigh pain while walking that goes away when you rest. The safest, most effective treatment for PAD is supervised exercise training, […]

  • Vaginal Yeast Infection

    Vaginal Yeast Infection

    What Is It? Vaginal yeast infections, also called “Candida vaginal infections,” typically are caused by the Candida albicans fungus. During a lifetime, 75% of all women are likely to have at least one vaginal Candida infection, and up to 45% have two or more. Women tend to be more likely to get vaginal yeast infections […]

  • Eating can cause low blood pressure, from the Harvard Heart Letter

    Eating can cause low blood pressure, from the Harvard Heart Letter

    If you sometimes feel dizzy or lightheaded after eating a meal, you could have a common condition called postprandial hypotension, meaning low blood pressure after eating, reports the July 2010 issue of the Harvard Heart Letter. Digestion is a complicated job that requires coordination between the digestive, nervous, and circulatory systems. To compensate for blood […]

  • Does prostate cancer screening matter?

    Does prostate cancer screening matter?

    The latest guidelines suggest you should have an engaged conversation with your doctor about PSA testing. Image: © Mark Bowden/Thinkstock An annual prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test to check for signs of possible prostate cancer sounds innocent enough, but new guidelines suggest the test offers few long-term benefits, and substantial possible harm. The updated guidelines from […]

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